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. john didonna from san francisco. this is just a general-ap,e philosophicalh at the root of the controversy is a question of what human beings are how are we t|( q7 act,:/( and function in a way that is true to our spirit nature, and intellect. i use the word intellect in its ancient text, to bev:( # one thing from another is the power to make?ipp distinctions to sort things throughwmo i've been] that concerns me the most in this battle for our minds. we should be taught not what to think, but how to think. thank you for listening. >> -- all the supervisors)i( of la you about the future my future, our future, the future of the city. we was discussing education in item 13, and i feel that ifl( don't fire up every channel if we don't liquidate every pipeline and search every avenue[vjld in! >> president chiu: excuse me, sir. we have a rule in the board chamber that issues that have already been discussed in committee can't be discussed in public comment today. that being said if you want to discuss educa
this organization and create and implement a vision for san francisco. which we are realizing today. and as of one of you just said, it is truly a testament that he has such an amazing group of people that are so talented and dedicated to a t to the authority's mission and trying to do the right thing in the city and we truly appreciate the support of this board and prior boards of making this happen. this is really like a celebration of the authority and i would like to take one quick minute to highlights the things that have happened in the past 12 months and completely amazing. >> when weiss came back to the organization as executive director in 2001, within two weeks he had inserted himself into the 2001 regional transportation plan process which as commissioners weiner and campos knows is at the critical moment that you know which projects will get funded and which won't. and due to his expertise and the arena not settling for less for san francisco which really should have more. we ended up with not just two projects that the city family was going to settle for, but we got the central subway
all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a another analyst looking into the ci
san francisco defines middle class. supervisor olague stated that the planning department says the middle class is 120 to 150% ami. it's not the planning department it's the housing element and the planning code. housing at 180% of af mi and above and defines middle class income housing as housing affordable to households making between 120 and 150% of median income. then we look at planning code section 4001 which defines middle income household as a household whose combined annual gross income for all members is between 120% and 150% of the local median income. so as a matter of policy, and as a matter of law, in san francisco, 120 toñjp 150% of area median income is middle class. so why on earth would anyone would try to strip out the reference to that income range6 as being middle class is something that i don't really understand. i also do not think that the mayor's office of housing has indicated that 120 to 150% of ami is upper middle income housing. when i did a hearing earlier this year about middle class housing there was a particular mayor's office office of housin
a 90-year-old san francisco institution that i'd like to commend today, and cynthia huey is here from the clement street merchants association, if she could come forward. i'm just very proud to work so closely with the clement street merchant association celebrating their 90th year this year. it's an organization that's been working hard to revitalize the richmond district, especially in the past few months as new leadership has emerged. the clement merchants association represents diverse businesses from a variety of cultural backgrounds that makes clement street stand out from other commercial districts. it's one of the most diverse places. i moved there in 1984 to second avenue and clement. it was considered the new chinatown but it's so much more than that. it's a gateway for many different types of newcomers but also businesses. this year, the clement street merchants celebrate their 90th year of outstanding service to the small business community to the whole city. and the roster is growing of many different businesses from cynthia huey's feed store, a great vintage clothing sto
of a poem. if it i had a summer home in san francisco, and i had a winter home in ben gazi i'd spend all my summers iníqrq winterña nzñ home. if you listen to these speakerso coming up energy coming from them is kind oft bitching about the city, and the way it's kind of violating its own charter of the sunshine ordinance. we saw many determinations in front ofcup which'sjÁindicates that something's”mhnnówhs awry. we have one supervisor previously from this chamber(jpq in custody wearing orange, anÏ= getting visits from hisijny friends in jail. and i'm just wondering some more of you shouldn't beoa::zku1&jd÷ú4Ñ+Ñ in$5jpkujauç there. thank you for your time. no hard82Ñ feelings. and have a good holidays. thankc/ t you. >> goodgupñgñ chiu and supervisor. i just want to say one thing. it's about time that you got some jobs here or1nsomething, or something to do, or even medical. i live at the edge of the tenderloin. there's nothing. you know, i can tellgj@ you. and i'm the most resourceful of all.
evening, supervisors. i'm elizabeth stampe, executive director of walk san francisco. and i'm here to encourage you to reject this appeal and affirm the planning department's decision to get these improvements happening as soon as possible on fell and oak, to calm traffic, and improve safety. these include 12 new bulbouts as you've heard, a shortened crossing district distance and increased visibility, and add new street greening. the traffic signals will be adjusted for lower speeds, safer speeds. these are important fixes to make some of the highest speed streets in our city closest to our most beloved park more safe for people walking. it clearly -- this project clearly falls into a categorical exemption from a full environmental review. it is clearly minor. and a reversal of the exemption would really set a bad precedent, forcing full reviews on traffic calming projects, even small scale fixes like bulbouts as well as other sustainable design improvements. a reversal would delay not only these current improvements that are much-needed as the previous speaker said on fell and oa
winning a pennant and how about those san francisco giants. i actually want to marco scutaro wanna be, but it's not going to work and today i will settle formality city librarian luis herr ra and i would like to welcome each and every one of you to our ceremony today. this is indeed a milestone because it's not only the beginning of construction to a new new library, but it's the end of the program, which means it's a long time coming. {$}[ applause ], what it means that this is the last project and i want to especially thank. north beach community for your patience, for your persistence and your perseverance to have the state-of-the-art library here in your neighborhood. [ applause ] thank you so much very much. [ applause ] >> let's talk a little bit about this library. it's going to be 60% larger than the other library that sits over there. 60% larger. that means more books, more media, wonderful technology, wi-fi access. if you envision this space and if you look that way you have a wonderful adult area. as you walk in from the mason street side, you have an amazing teen center
. nor do we have really the answer from the san francisco unified school district about how they prioritize this in light of some of the other budget priorities that they may have. so i think we would benefit from having a continuance, but i do think these are very important questions to ask before we make this decision. so again i want to thank supervisor kim for the continuance. i do think that the cause is a worthy one. i think having credits that kids can catch up on is a good thing to have kids be able to graduate from our school district. but i think it matters about how the school district intends to prioritize this in their own budget. i think it matters about how they intend to continue supporting this in the long run. thank you. >> president chiu: supervisor elsbernd. >> supervisor elsbernd: thank you, mr. president. this is likely my last clans to chime in on something supervisor mar talked about because this is a bit of a precursor to the prop h discussion that you will have over the next 12 months. and hearing supervisor campos talk to some extent i felt if i cl
predecessors passed a law that made san francisco a transit first city. here we are 40 years later talking about removing a bike lane because there are too many private automobiles that will be going around looking for parking. we're not talking about doing initiatives to improve car share or the hundreds of people who will not have to use a car because of these bike lanes. we're talking about removing a bike lane for private automobiles which is so profoundly idiotic. i think it really boggles the mind. the last point is really to reiterate what i told mta board which is that we're living in a time -- crisis this is a time when we need bold action. we don't need two and a half years of looking at six blocks on fell and oak. we have other cities laughing at us, chicago, minneapolis, portland, new york. i encourage you to reject the appeal. thank you. >> president chiu: walter, his you've already participated in this public comment. no, you can't, actually. thank you. are there any other members of the public that wish to speak in public comment on behalf of the project sponsor? okay. why d
. colleagues, today, we have before us legislation restricting public nudity in parts of san francisco. this legislation, which is much more narrow than the broad nudity ban that has been in place in our parks and port for decades acknowledges that public nudity in part of san francisco, and that it's appropriate in some circumstances. the legislation also acknowledges that public nudity is not always appropriate and particularly in our neighborhoods and commercial districts, where we all have to together, public nudity can go too far. for many years, public nudity has been part of san francisco. we have it at our street fairs, parades, beaches, some of our bars, and the occasional and sporadic naked person wandering our streets. for many years it wasn't a big deal and few people cared. over the past two years, the situation on our streets and particularly in the castro has changed. it's no longer random and sporadic. it's no longer an occasional quirky part of san francisco. rather than in the castro it's seven days a week, pretty much every single day in this neighborhood where peopl
, that this in san francisco, the middle income housing orcpye middle i. and the housing element and the planning( b%ú codes.1 k8 so no one is making up a random phrase or arbitrarily putting this label on. this is how we define it. again i think it is sending a that we're not going to -- we're say that -- say two teachers living together in a household are not really middle income. we just don't feel comfortable referring to them as middle income. i think it sends a very bad message. colleagues i suggest that we reject this amendment or at least that portion of the vote. >> president chiu: any further discussion? okay. amendment. >> clerk calvillo: supervisor avalos, aye. supervisor campos, aye. supervisor campos, aye. president chiu,> elsbernd, no. supervisor farrell, no. supervisor kim, aye. supervisor mar, aye. supervisor wiener, no. there are seven ayes and four nos. >> president chiu: the motion passes. unless there's further discussion why don'thtp we takea roll call vote on the underlying ordinance as amended. supervisor wiener. >> supervisor wiener: thank you, mr. president. i did vote a
-class public school system that our children deserve. and in san francisco, a city of great affluence to the extent that the federal and state governments are not stepping up to the plate, we have historically, as city government, done that, and that's why we have created things like the rainy day fund and prop h. this has been very clear from the beginning. but one thing that i did raise last time, and i want to make sure that on the record i get some assurances on, is the issue of the rainy day fund. the rainy day fund has -- was created for a reason, and has its own mechanism of how it works, and it's something that should stand on its own two feet, irrespective of what we choose to do or not do for the school district by way of a/%( supplemental. so through the chair, i just wanted to ask a question of the budget director, or the controller, whoever it might be the appropriate person. i just want to make sure that on the record we get assurances that if this is voted on, and this passes, that it will not touch the rainy day fund. >> president chiu: mr. controller. >> supervisors,
in san francisco. we're losing ground in terms of our middle class leaving because of the cost of housing and other issues and we need to turn that around. one of the reasons a month ago why i offered the amendments i did was to make sure we were tracking housing production, not just of low income but in addition, middle income as well. the last thing we as a board should be doing is to start signaling that people who are in the middle class are actually in the upper middle class or wealthy, whatever it is that a signal by accepting this amendment. what is 120 to 150%, in terms of dollar amounts. a two person household making 98,900 a year is at 120% of ami. a two person household making 123,000 is 150% of ami. category? two san francisco unified school district teachers with five years of service and bachelor's degrees are at 120% of ami. so two pretty junior teachers living together are in this 120 to 150 range of ami. now, we can talk about the building trades, and the carpenters, et cetera, who fall -- two of them are living together, would fall into 120% now let's look at the upper e
in this wonderful effort, how to make san francisco the character of serving and sharing as it should always be. and, so, again, please call 311 or go to our websites. i direct you for all of that and for continuing this wonderful holiday spirit. but most importantly, for caring for each other. thank you very much and have a happy holiday. thank you. (applause) ... mayor lee, supervisors, come on up. and while they are doing that, let's get started. what a beautiful, beautiful day, give yourselves a round of applause. [ applause ] >> fantastic. this is like winning a pennant and how about those san francisco giants. i actually want to marco scutaro wanna be, but it's not going to work and today i will settle formality city librarian luis herr ra and i would like to welcome each and every one of you to our ceremony today. this is indeed a milestone because it's not only the beginning of construction to a new new library, but it's the end of the program, which means it's a long time coming. {$}[ applause ], what it means that this is the last project and i want to especially thank. north beach comm
message to the people of san francisco. >> president chiu: supervisor olague -- and before you respond, supervisor olague, our clerk wanted to clarify that the additional language of or other available data you will make that amendment to all references where it refers to data on households earning approximately 120 to 150%. >> supervisor olague: yes. >> president chiu: okay. so hopefully that's clear to our city attorney. supervisor olague. >> supervisor olague: basically, i think what's important is that the reporting and the analysis capture 120 to 150. originally, the reporting was only going to go up to 120 because that is kind of the standard -- the bar that's set i then, you know, there was an amendment proposed to increase it to 150, which i don't think there was any disputing that any debate. i think yeah, we agreed, it should be included in there. but there still seemed to be some -- i don't know if disagreement is the right word. there seems to be some semantics going on here around, you know, is it upper moderate income housing, which is what my understanding was, that mayo
think that we have a crisis in san francisco. happening in our public you know, we have one of the highest performing urban school districts in the country. we probably have the highest we probably have the highest performing urban schoolt and, yet, in such a high performing district, we still have a number of young people who are not doing well for whom the system is really failing. and i think that it's unacceptable to have the level of achievement gap that we have in san francisco. and even though money and resources is not the be-all, end-all it is part of the equation, it is part of the answer. it reality is -- and i say this as someone who worked at the school district for many years -- that there is only so much that the administration, that our teachers can do, that our parents can do, without those resources. and so that's why i think this is important, and this is important now. because i do think that we have a crisis. and the thing about the achievement gap and the low performance of some of these kids is that we also know that the™jpkñ gap becomes. and that,
. >>> okay, thank you very much. i have been a tour guide in san francisco for the last 15 years. i am a member of the san francisco tour guide guild, but i'm not speaking on their behalf because we are all independent. however, i had done walking tours in north beach, so, i'm familiar with that and they've been my most successful people. love the area. as a matter of fact, [speaker not understood] has been a lovely stop there. but i haven't gone through that neighborhood, but i can imagine what she's going through. whenever you open a magazine and the san francisco travel is promoting the city, they're promoting all our neighborhoods. i also conduct tours for folks in motor coach to get from one side of the city to the other. please keep in mind that columbus avenue is a major artery. when i take us around the city and i need to move around in three hours so they can go on to something else, or four, that i simply cannot afford to eliminate all of north beach and hie because my only route is columbus avenue, unless i go by van ness. and particularly with the america's cup coming in, w
and there is a nudity ban in the city and county of san francisco. and let's just say that once the ban is in place, you have a number of individuals who defy the ban, andjru÷et( ÷ actuallyo be nude in public. at some point, law enforcement will be called in to enforce the law that was just passed, and at jp$éó point, resources will be expended by our law enforcement agencies to enforce thatwjp law. i represent district 9. district 9 includes the neighborhood of the mission, which actually shares a police station with district 8, with the castro. mission station, mission police station, serves both the castro and the mission. and i]b@%Ñ can tell you that evy time that an incident happens in district 9, and unfortunately recently we have been talking about violent incidents and i call the captain and ask for more foot patrols and i ask for increasing the timeliness of the response, i ask for different strategies to deal with violent crime, the response repeatedly is i don't have the resources, i don't have the resources to do all the things that need to be done, i don't -- i think the captain is do
introduced this legislation. public nudity, currently, is not -- is legal in san francisco, other than in our parks, port, and in restaurants. there's been a suggestion that we should use lewd behavior laws, particularly the indecent exposure provisions of the california penal code. i don't agree with that. i think that using lewd behavior laws is problematic and ineffective. first of all, there are going to be a lot of borderline cases about whether something is lewd or not lewd and you're putting a police officer in a terrible position of trying to determine is this person a little bit aroused or not aroused, is that adornment on the person's genitals lewd or not lewd, did he shake his genitals a little too vigorously to draw attention. no police officer should make that determination and to be blunt no police officer will. if addition if left with the choice of only charging someone with indecent exposure for lewd behavior under state law as some in opposition to this legislation are suggesting if you're convicted of indecent exposure you become a registered sex offender when you're done.
appreciate the comments made by many in the audience of san francisco's uniqueness and our diverse culture but especially our respect for personal freedoms. i also have concerns similar to supervisor campos' that this may be an issue that's about one neighborhood, and mostly about one plaza, and i really don't think we need citywide legislation, especially overbroad legislation to deal with an isolated what i would call an isolated community incident. and i think this legislation also, as supervisor olague said, is not good use of our time and i will be voting no on it as well. >> president chiu: is there further discussion? supervisor wiener. >> supervisor wiener: thank you. thank you arbitration colleagues, for your comments. i just want to make a few points. first of all -- and some of the points i've heard today are some that some of the opposite have raised as well. to suggest this is not important enough or worthy of our time i did a little research and we could go back and i could probably find some resolutions and ordinances from pretty much every member of this body, that would --
how to improve the bike network in san francisco and ever since we've been talking about how to increase pedestrian safety, oak street and fell street are three lanes in each direction, four lanes in some places, they carry 30,000-plus cars each day on each street. and people in this neighborhood and people who just move throughout the city have said that these streets don't feel safe, they don't feel comfortable, please do something about it. and it took a while and it took some momentum to get us going but we finally did it. we finally brought the community together and we worked over nine months with a variety of stakeholders, local stakeholders, people throughout the city. and we came up with a plan. and that plan went before the mta board. they considered the policy merits of it and decided to pass it unanimously on october 16. again, i just wanted to emphasize because i think it's so important that we were able to engage so many people throughout the community and to come up with a plan that was balanced. and we considered several options. we considered removing a lane
unacceptable to have the level of achievement gap that we have in san francisco. and even though money and resources is not the be-all, end-all it is part of the equation, it is part of the answer. it reality is -- and i say this as someone who worked at the school district for many years -- that there is only so much that the administration, that our teachers can do, that our parents can do, without those resources. and so that's why i think this is important, and this is important now. because i do think that we have a crisis. and the thing about the achievement gap and the low performance of some of these kids is that we also know that the™jpkñ gap becomes. and that, you know, to the extent that you wait six months, you wait a year, however the wait might be, that to have the impact then that you can have today, you probably will end up having to spend more money. and so that's why i believe that the sooner that we can act,ropíq better. so thank you again to everyone who's worked on this. >> president chiu: supervisor kim. >> supervisor kim: thank you. i just want to clari
spend more than we do on per people spending. in response to this in 2004 san francisco voters passed a measure to counter this. parents knew that although we were once first in the country in our public school system, not just k-12 but also higher education that we were neveris% going back there. so parents put on the ballot a measure called proposition h so we could ask the city to spend a morgs of our tax dollars to enrich our public schools. i know as a policy set asides are a controversial issue and agree they tie hands of legislators and city officials in how to prioritize budgetary dollars but we heard affirmative support from voters saying they of those dollars will go into our public schools, starting at 10 million and going up to 60 million. as a school board member i try to visit all of our schools and i visit schools almost once a week during the school year. and i can't tell you what an incredible impact proposition h has made in our schools. you actually see libraries in elementary schools, that hadn't been open in years, they didn't have librarians to put books in their
for san francisco. >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner olague? >> i wanted to thank you for everything, it has been a real pleasure working with your department over the past few years. on issues like level of service, with racial and i know that she has done a lot of amazing work and tilly, whether it is congestion pricing or any of the other questions that i have had have you been helpful, i have enjoyed this committee and one of my favorite committees that i serve on. and i have enjoyed the subject matter and that is the implications around transportation and planning are great for a lot of diverse populations in the city and the implications are greater than they were even like sometimes acknowledging us. so thank you for your work and i hope that you enjoy your retirement and as, superviser, mar mentioned that you have time to spend with music and other things that you love. so thank you. >> like i said, we will have an opportunity to make a formal presentation and recognition, but, i have to say that not only as an mtc commissioner and as a chair, i appreciate work
of automobiles registered in san francisco decreased by about 1%. so that's a piece of evidence that would seem to indicate that the idea that, when you remove parking from a very dense neighborhood, that there's no impact, is just against the common sense of almost everybody who lives in that neighborhood, and who's ever had to find parking. >> supervisor campos: aren't they adding parking as well in some streets? >> well the net -- the removing of 100 parking spaces on oak and fell, they are putting back a certain number -- so that includes both the bulbouts and the parking removal for the bike lanes. they're putting back a certain number, about 13 i think it is, by removing some of the bus stops on the 21 hayes. and in fact one of those bus stops that they were going to remove was actually outside what they considered the project area. but the other thing is that they're going to be doing is converting what is now parallel parking on three blocks of baker and one block of scott into either a -- in some cases perpendicular and in some cases back-in angled parking. but they to get credit for t
parking. it's based on the opinion, or the experience of san francisco traffic planners. but the fact -- essentially, their argument is that when you remove parking, people either shift their mode of transportation, or they just decide to stay away altogether. well there's some statistics, i don't have them -- i don't have the exact numbers but i looked recently, the mta has these annual reports, and from about 2008 to 2011, the number of street parking spaces decreased by 12 or 13%, and the number of automobiles registered in san francisco decreased by about 1%. so that's a piece of evidence that would seem to indicate that the idea that, when you remove parking from a very dense neighborhood, that there's no impact, is just against the common sense of almost everybody who lives in that neighborhood, and who's ever had to find parking. >> supervisor campos: aren't they adding parking as well in some streets? >> well the net -- the removing of 100 parking spaces on oak and fell, they are putting back a certain number -- so that includes both the bulbouts and the parking removal for th
of directors and also a former san mateo county supervisor, mayor of daly city and san francisco police inspector and not only served on our board, but numerous other regional transportation boards and we'll always be appreciative to mike for all of his work in the area of transportation, as well as his commitment for those in need. we extend our sympathies to mike and his family. i would also like to thank director reiskin, because a few board meetings ago director reiskin suspected that suggested that we look into that and found it's viable and could save us money and we modeled after the department of public works and caltrans regulations, allowing for savings during the bid submission and bidders will be encouraged to submit their value engineering proposals that will decrease the bid price, construction cost and if a proposal is accepted the savings attributable to that value engineering proposed are subtracted from the bidder's bid price making their bid price more competitive and improving the likelihood of approval of the work. we'll realize 100% of the savings with the bidders
in san francisco. i have been to japan and norway for fly casting competition. i spend my weekends here at the club and at the casting pond. it's a great place to learn and have fun. on a season day like this, it was the perfect spot to be. i find fly casting very relaxing and also at the same time very challenging sport. takes me out into the nature. almost like drawing art in the air. and then i can make these beautiful loops out there. >> even though people from across the globe come here to compete, it's still a place where locals in the know relax and enjoy some rely unique scenery. until next time, get out and play! z. >> the meeting will come to order. this is the monday, december 10, 2012 meeting of the land development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. it's our last meeting of the year. my name is eric mar, chairman of the committee, our clerk is miss alisa miller. miss miller, are there announcements for us? >> please make sure to silence all cell phones and electronic devices. items acted upon today will appear on the january 15th board of supervisors
>> ms. olague. for me this is old san francisco values you represent the more 67ive district and you obviously take a lot of pride in your catholic upbringing the fact your irish heritage and i think you represent a lot of those old fashion values that i think are many and a certain kind of add horns to tradition or respect for tradition that i think is admirable, actually and i was reminded of that when you were giving your comments about to mike 97ian last week when he excellent on what his values was and when i sat next to you at the cans committee i would look over and see pictures of you with your son and very cute and so i think it's kind-of cool that we do have those very traditional values that are still important in this culture, so, even though, i think you have helped me resolve my identity crisis and so, i guess i'm progressive. and but i just admire your values and i admire your family values and there is something to be learned from those values. so thank you., thank you supervisor olague and, last by not least supervisor avalos. >> i didn't relevancy i was
. they are one of my top priorities. even when you look at our prison system for example, just in san francisco county jail alone 75% of inmates didn't graduate from high school. like what can we do to prevent that number from increasing. it's to graduate our kids from high school. this 800,000 is not a lot. it's modest for what we're trying to do. it will help enrichment programs to keep our kids in school. and the other thing i'll say is in regards to our school district, over the last few years, for the first time in over a decade, the school district has actually been reversing the widening achievement gap. and i forget what year it started but since roughly about five years ago the school district has narrowed the the achievement gap every year. and previous to that it had only widened every year meaning the gap between african-american, pacific islander and latino students versus white and asian-american students. now we are finally narrowing that gap so district is on trap, we're doing the work we need to do. this small amount of money will help the school district do the work that it's
in san francisco where you can actually have these raised concrete plantares in the middle of the street in effect which will be safety hazard and so forth, plus all of the parking lots, when you combine the two, would impact each other. but getting back to the -- >> supervisor wiener: do you think any time you add a bike lane does that require an eir? >> any time. >> supervisor wiener: if you add a bike lane to a road that didn't have it before. >> i think there's a pretty good argument that's the case but we don't have to get to that here because you've got the plantares, you've got the fact that -- well what i would say is this particular exemption would not apply if you're putting a bike lane where none exists before because it's a -- it's for existing facilities. the other one is minor alterations and again this is not a minor alteration. you're putting raised concrete plan tars along fell and oak for three blocks of a densely populated congested area and turning it the other direction, if the removal of parking lanes or travel lanes and replace it with bicycle lanes were automatica
bikes and it's an integral part. but when you look at san francisco and how the city interacts and the infrastructure these are key areas for both a residential, commercial, and also distribution of thoroughfares through the city so major changes in how it's structured could have a dramatic and material impact on how people get to work and how the city flows. so i think it is important -- as of now, no one really has a thorough understanding of what the impact would be because practically no studies have been done. so before we really make major changes, it is important to go through the steps. and don't put ourselves in a position where we make a -- harmful impact by eliminating some of the major thoroughfares through the city. >> good evening. my name is -- 7:30 pm last night divisadero and oak, bicyclist running a red light, three pedestrians entering the crosswalk, look of shock in their eyes. to avoid hitting anything or anybody, the bicyclist swerved and turned into oncoming traffic. fortunately no one was injured. fortunately nobody was hurt. these types of incidents are
, but the way things are done around here is so embedded in san francisco government culture that the potential benefits to the san francisco community that have been raised, not just by us, are more than ignored. they are mocked by a city administration fearing change. we believe that only the mayor can make the changes that we and others have proposed. no one else has the direct authority over government operations than he has. he can do it if he is willing to put the passionate leadership he puts in attracting tech business to the city and improving the organization and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". thank you. >> thank you for the time and effort put into that report. any questions right now president chiu. all right. with that i would like to ask the ma
development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. it's our last meeting of the year. my name is eric mar, chairman of the committee, our clerk is miss alisa miller. miss miller, are there announcements for us? >> please make sure to silence all cell phones and electronic devices. items acted upon today will appear on the january 15th board of supervisors agenda unless otherwise stated. >> thank you, i'd like to thank sfgtv which televises us each meeting. i'd like to say we have 7 items on the agenda today. madam clerk, please call item 1. >> item 1 is a resolution granting a street encroachment at 54 peralta avenue for construction of a driveway ramp. >> sponsor is david chiu and from dpw we have david qwan >> my name is eleanor tapk and i am with the department of public works. our office received a major encroachment request from sia consulting on october 26, 2011. the request is to remove and reconstruction a portion of the city-owned maintaining wall to construct a concrete driveway ramp with transition slope to conform to the existing sidewalk grade in order to pr
to give san franciscoians to give san franciscos what they deserve but i do it my other way you fight do it my other way you work and i look forward to watching you do that into the future. you will not see me at public comment, but, i'll certainly be fascinated to see how you all do and i hope you do keep in mind that general principal that i have heard you all articulate in different ways we absolutely live in the greatest city in the world and to represent the greatest people in the world san franciscoians and you have a tremendous aren'ts in living up to that honor and i wish you all the best in that endeavor. (applause). . . >> again thank you supervisor elsburnd and supervisor olague but know that you will not be here in the champ next month but you will be here with us in spirit and with that colleagues i want to get back to the people's business and it we could go to our four p m special order. if you could read the items please. . >> colleagues west front of us today the appeal of the review exceptions for the proposed project on each street and we will consider the suffic
in san francisco. i'm here to address the central subway construction option of north beach * . our last meeting was november 19th, which has been mentioned, when we finally had representatives of the mta present what they plan to do, and nobody in north beach had heard or agreed with any of it. so, i mentioned at that meeting that i have never missed a vote. i've been in this city for 45 years, but i couldn't remember having voted on this project. i was informed correctly that the taxpayers voted for the subway in the late 1990s for a $6 47 million expense, which is now $1.58 billion, with a b. the whole project is too little too late. and the mta has made cost cuts, but prices continue to rise. as required by the federal law, the city of san francisco must pay for all overruns on this project. i ask the mta board what are your latest project costs? and how can we continue this new project when our present and regular equipment are continually breaking down, as was mentioned yesterday when 250,000 people were put out of work because of faulty equipment that had not been kept up. thank y
and this city and county of san francisco who should be helping our veterans, i am requesting the gentleman to accommodate the veterans. if he does not then i will take it to the highest level. thank you very much. >> thank you. next speaker. >> (singing) ain't no valley high, ain't no valley low, ain't no space wide enough can stop us. if you need an artist we'll find a space for you, you don't need to worry, ain't no city space wide enough, ain't no city space low enough can keep me from spaces to you, remember the day you made a space, you made so free and i know i thanked you for what you did and i know now that i'm glad and make it better, don't make it sad. and there are spaces i remember all my life i got an artist space and these spaces have some meaning and now it's up to you too. >> thank you, walter. next speaker. >> good afternoon, i'm donna figarota with the union square business district. i just wanted to talk a little bit about the background for this project. it grew out of a larger vision for hallidie plaza that was developed by the bid streetscapes committee that woul
i don't like subways. i like the fresh air, the sun, the stars, the beau pi of san francisco. * beauty that's all i need to say. >> thank you very much. the public hearing is closed at this point. members of the board, i have several items i would like to raise here at this point. and i think the first would be the overall thing has been said and i agree with this completely. i'd love to see us go to north beach and fisherman's wharf and the pledge efforts to begin to look at that. there are obviously questions of financing and all of that. but it is certainly worth weill to go. i'm not sure about the suggestion to sauselido. that may be beyond our means at this point. the other two would be a wonderful way to connect the entire city. and i'll also talk a little about the timeline. i think i agree with the notion of changing the resolution to bring it back to the board before the director of transportation makes the final die significance. i would suggest that the language be something along the lines of the second meeting in january which should be the third tuesday in janu
to save money? is that our goal in san francisco? i suggest to you and i am not embarrassed by the fact we're are the innovation city and it's a lot of money and i think we should be innovative with that money and don't you feel bad because you're government and always a lagger? i don't feel i am. i come from the private sector and i can be as innovative as others and granted i don't have certain challenges and i don't have shareholders breathing down my neck but i have other challenges and remember that most organizations that centralize to do it to save money. most are about the performance they're achieving and they out source to inch krimentally save more money and a cost savings discussion and if we use technology as a driver and this is from the department's perspective i think we're kind of squeezing blood out of a turnip at that point. i think the question is are we getting our money's worth? do we clear clee understand for the money that we spend on it in the city are we achieving what we want to achieve? for that money should you be on the old email system or a new one?
in san francisco and city government and i will say these challenges are not easy to solve but we're not doing our job on the board if we're not willing innovate and drive that home in house so i look forward to this continuing dialogue so we made a number of findings and recommendations. what i am going to do before making a motion i am open it up for public comment. if anyone would like to speak for public comment and we will have two minutes per person. >> great. david pillpow and i was watching this somewhere else and i know you were concerned there was no public comment on item one and i ran over. i have been a participant in coit and i have several points. i spoke back in february at coit and express the strong opinion it was time for mr. walton to be replaced as city cio and director of dt. that was a very strong recommendation. that was not something that i took lightly and apparently something that shocked a number of people and the responses speak on to that. i believe that position, head of dt, collaborative and build trust and if that happens those things will
$75 ticket or whatever, they're going to decide they're not going to shop in san francisco. you're trying to get people to take public transit. they're not going to take all their bags shopping on the bus and go home. they just bought a nice expensive coat, birthday present for their spouse or their significant other and they're not going to want to carry it on the bus and have someone steal it from them, you know. a lot of people still don't feel safe being on public transit. i think that -- i can the thing is, though, if you keep costing more and more to come into the city, especially on sundays, you're going to be cutting off your nose despite your face. that's all i'm going to say about that.
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